Wednesday, January 28, 2015

Bach Chaconne free pdf bwv 1004 flute solo

Dear Flutelovers,

A wonderful free arrangement of the J.S. Bach Chaconne for solo violin, transcribed for flute:
Updated link on May 8th 2016:

Bach Chaconne for Flute in pdf

Level: Advanced.

The above is Tom Sargeaunt's transcription, and it seriously rocks!
Enjoy! (Huge thanks to Tom!!)

See Denis Bouriakov play it. Video:  Part 1. Part 2.

Bach Chaconne BWV 1004 performed/arranged by Denis Bouriakov.

Part 1:


Part 2:




If you're wondering where to add slurs, listen to the Bouriakov video, and play with it.
(use the pause button frequently.)
Hours of fun!
 okay...honestly,
a lifetime of fun!

____________
Also of interest: Emma at 14


A captivating interview with 14 year old Emma Resmini.
See pg. 1 and pg. 4 at New York Flute Club Newsletter Jan 15/15: here.

Best.
Jen
Comments (8)
Blogger Christine Gietzen said...

Wow! This is a beautiful piece! I am already learning to play it. Thank you so much for sharing this and posting the You Tube video of Denis Bouriakov's performance. I do have a question though. I noticed that Denis has a unique posture... he holds his flute at an angle and it appears that he places the mouth piece to the side of his mouth. Is there a reason for this?

Saturday, January 31, 2015 8:34:00 PM

 
Blogger jen said...

Hi Christine,
About one in every fifty flute players plays to the side of the mouth. The reasons are:

1. The upper lip has a "tear drop" that hangs down in the middle of the aperture, so the player closes the aperture on one side to avoid having this lip bump disrupt the air column.

2. The teeth have an unusual shape that interferes with the lip opening being strongest in the center of the lips.

3. The player has a scar or thickening of the lips that interferes with the lip opening being strongest in the center of the lips.

4. The player has aged (70+), and can no longer comfortably hold their arms up as well as they could when they were younger, or have lost teeth on one side of the mouth (Example: Rampal for arms and Moyse for teeth may fall into this category but there's no absolute proof.)
Hope this helps.
Jen

Saturday, January 31, 2015 8:40:00 PM

 
Blogger Christine Gietzen said...

Wow, Jen! I had no idea so thanks for explaining that. ;-)

Sunday, February 01, 2015 4:33:00 PM

 
Blogger jen said...

Dear Christine, You're welcome. I guess you learn these things from being so close to the flute world for so many decades. This question often comes up when a flutist is deciding whether their offset embouchure is natural or not, or whether they should change it.
Best, Jen

Sunday, February 01, 2015 5:24:00 PM

 
Blogger Lorette said...

Wow. Just Wow. That is a gorgeous performance. I heard the Chaconne played live by a virtuoso mandolinist a few years ago, it was spectacular. Your right, this might take a lifetime of practice to be able to play!

Saturday, February 07, 2015 10:39:00 AM

 
Blogger jen said...

Yes indeedy. I've been working on it for something like five years now! Still as amazing and gorgeous every single time, but WOW, yeah...phew.
hahaha. Jen :>D

Saturday, February 07, 2015 11:37:00 AM

 
Blogger DKA said...

Hi seems the T Sargeaunt transcription is no long available online - is there another one you recommend? I picked one up off score exchange (Bruce Conway trans) and compared it to the performance by Megumi Nakamura (which I find quite amazing, although I havent followed with violin score so cant comment on accuracy of notes) - check out バッハ シャコンヌ フルート 中村 めぐみ(Bach Chaconne) - and there seemed to be parts that are quite different ... Thanks

Drew

Saturday, January 23, 2016 8:42:00 AM

 
Blogger jen said...

Hi Drew,
So sorry the link stopped working; will keep an eye out. Best, Jen

Saturday, January 23, 2016 9:07:00 AM

 

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